Articles & Resources

Throughout the ongoing life of the project, literature reviews have been undertaken on topics relevant to project initiatives. Topics explored included issues associated with transitions to school, community capacity-building, Education leadership  parent participation in their children learning and effective strategies to promote educational change. Sample readings include

  • Australian Government Department of Education (2014). Students first: Review of the Australian Curriculum – Initial Australian Government Response. DET: Canberra.

  • Education Services Australia Ltd as the legal entity for the Standing Council on School Education and Early Childhood (SCSEEC). ©2013A practice guide for working with families from pre-birthto eight years Engaging Families in the Early Childhood Benveniste, J, Parent Wellbeing, South Australia, June 2013.

  • Cartmel, J. and Grieshaber, S. (2014). Communicating for quality in school-age care services. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood. 39 (3) pp23-28.

  • Cartmel, J., Macfarlane, K., Casley, M. (2012). Reflection as a tool for quality: Working with the National Quality Standard. ACT: Early Childhood Australia.

  • Connelly, FM, Clandinin, DJ and He, MF. (1997). Teachers' personal practical knowledge on the professional knowledge landscape. Teaching and teacher education, 13 (7), 665-674.

  • Creswell, J.W. (2013). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches. Thousand Oaks, California.

  • Dinham, XX (2007) Leadership for teacher learning, student success and school renewal. Australian Journal of Education, 51.  (3) pp263-275.

  • Dockett, S. and Perry, B. (2014). Continuity of Learning: A resource to support effective transition to school and school age care. Canberra, ACT: Australian Government Department of Education.

  • Dunlop, A-W. and Fabian, H. (Eds) (2007). Informing transitions in the early years: Research, policy and practice. London: OUP/McGraw Hill.

  • Early Childhood Australia (ECA) and the Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA). (2013) Foundations for learning: Relationships between the Early Years Learning Framework and the Australian Curriculum. Retrieved 3/10/15 from http://foundationinquirylearning.global2.vic.edu.au/files/2013/06/ECA_ACARA_Foundations_Paper-2cq59mi.pdf

  • Edwards, A. (2012). The role of common knowledge in achieving collaboration across practices. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction. 1. pp22-32.

  • Edwards, A. (2011). Building common knowledge at boundaries between professional practices. International Journal of Educational Research, 50, pp33–39.

  • Emerson, L., Fear. J., Fox, S., and Sanders, E. (2012). Parental engagement in learning and schooling: Lessons from research. A report by the Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth (ARACY) for the Family-School and Community Partnerships Bureau: Canberra.

  • Fullan, M. (2000). The Three Stories of Education Reform, Phi Delta Kappan, 81 (April), pp581-584.

  • Fullan, M. (2006). The future of educational change: system thinkers in action. Journal of Educational Change. 7 pp113-122.

  • Groundwater-Smith, S. and Campbell, A. (2009). Connecting Inquiry and Professional Learning in Education: International Perspectives and Practical Solutions. London: Routledge.

  • Hartley, C., Rogers, P., Smith, J., Peters, S. & Carr, M. (2012). Crossing the border: A community negotiates the transition from early childhood to primary school. Wellington: NZCER Press.

  • Hattie, J. A. C. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. London, UK: Routledge. 

  • Hattie John (2015): What Doesn’t Work in Education: The Politics of Distraction, London: Pearson

  • John Hattie 2011 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING: Maximising the Dividend  http://visible-learning.org/2013/02/john-hattie-presentation-maximising-the-impact-video-transcript/

  • Henderson, L. (2014). When early childhood and school meet: Exploring potential within early childhood-school relationships. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood. 39 (3) pp29-36.

  • Margonis, F. (2012). In pursuit of respectful teaching and intellectually dynamic social fields. In G.J.J.Biesta (Ed). Making sense of education: Fifteen contemporary educational theorists in their own worlds. Dordrecht: Springer. pp5-12.

  • Moss, P. (2013). The relationship between early childhood and compulsory education: A properly political question. In P. Moss (Ed.). Early childhood and compulsory education: Reconceptualising the relationship. Milton Park. Oxon: Routledge. pp2-49.

  • Nolan, A., Hamm, C., McCartin, J., Hunt., Scott, C., & Barty, K. (2009). Outcomes and Indicators of a Positive Start to School: Report prepared by Victoria University for the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. Melbourne: Victoria University.

  • Semann, A., Madden, L., Fleet, A., De Gioia, K. (2015). Report on TRANSITION: A POSITIVE START TO SCHOOL: Supporting Reciprocal Visits project. Sydney: Semann & Slattery in conjunction with the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEET). (June)

  • Siraj-Blatchford, I. (2010). A focus on pedagogy: Case studies of effective practice. Ch 8 in K. Sylva et al. (Eds.) Early Childhood Matters: Evidence from the Effective Pre-school and primary Education Project. London: Routledge.

  • Siraj-Blatchford, I. and Manni, L (2006). Effective Leadership in the Early Years Sector (ELEYS) Study. London: Institute of Education, University of London. 

  • Wenger, E.C. and Snyder, W. M. (2007). Cultivating Communities of Practice: A Guide to Managing Knowledge. Harvard.

  • Winter, P. (2010). Engaging Families in the Early Childhood Development Story - A National Project: Neuroscience and Early Childhood Development. Carlton South, Victoria: Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs.

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